Category: Preventative Health (page 1 of 14)

Sedation is Not a Bad Word

Sedation in Pets

Veterinary medicine has a few words or phrases that nobody wants to hear…”maggots”, “hit by car”, and “quiet”, to name a few.  However, “sedation” is not one of them.  As a pet owner, you undoubtedly can be concerned about your pet being sick and needing to undergo sedation or anesthesia because those are often emergency situation.  Most younger pets undergoing anesthesia for a spay or neuter will do quite well and potentially may be less of a concern for pet owners.  Older pets can often do fine under anesthesia or sedation as well as long we monitor closely and take proper precautions. Continue reading

A Promise to Patients

My New Promise to Patients

I graduated from veterinary school in 2006.  Wow – that wasn’t that long ago, or was it?  It’s only been 12 years but since then veterinary medicine has changed.  Medically, we have made more advances to provide better top-notch care.  However, socially and perception-wise, veterinary medicine has been tarnished due to the evolution of the internet and social media.  It has driven a number of my colleagues out of the profession, into a depressive state, or in the worst cases – suicide.  I’m doing fine and am constantly evolving to provide the best care that I can.  As a result, this is my promise to patients: Continue reading

Spay & Neuter – A Revised Point of View

The times they are a changing.  Every now and then in the course of medicine, we get new research that guides us to change our ways of thinking and how we practice.  And we live in exciting times because now is one of those moments.  New research has been presented regarding potentially more appropriate age of spay or neuter surgery for your dog, most notably larger dogs.  Don’t worry, I’ll also discuss cats.

age of spay or neuter can affect many heath factors

No, I haven’t changed my stance that the procedure should still be done.  But I agree and am glad to see some changes in the timing of when we as veterinarians recommend the surgery happen.  Let’s explore this and try make sense of the differences.

The first thing you have to look at is what breed, or at least size, of dog you have.  The next thing you have to consider is what are your goals you’re trying to achieve with your pet’s health – joint development & health, cancer risks, behavior, etc.  Lastly, we need to consider their lifestyle.  Much of the research focused on some common breeds (Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers , Rottweilers, Viszlas) but we can try to extrapolate from this data.  So let’s discuss…. Continue reading

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