Brachycephalic Dogs & Breathing Problems

Another summer has arrived! And with it comes the scorching heat. While many of us enjoy this time of year, there are some who don’t. I can’t blame them for hating it. It’s hot, humid, and it makes it more difficult for them to breathe. That’s right, I’m talking about brachycephalic dogs including my friends #1 pug pals, Miss Edie the Pug and her sister Edna (fortunately, they’re good!).

Brachycephalic dogs are affectionately known by many other names including “smooshy face dogs.” While many of them have been glamorized and idolized by Hollywood, years of poor breeding have led to numerous problems particularly in the breathing department. This is not to say that all breeders have contributed to the problem but random matings have worsened the problem known as Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome (or BOAS) which has 5 components.

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Baby on Board & Pets Too!

Clients have often asked me if I have kids, and the answer has always been, “yes, furry and four (or 3 legged).” Yeah, I’m talking about my pets. But exciting news on the way, a human baby will soon be arriving in my home! Whereas I’m really proficient at taking care of pets, a baby is a whole other experience that my wife and I are feverishly reading books to prepare for this momentous life change. At the same time, some people have asked, “what about your pets?” Babies and pets can be a cute combination but it takes some practice.

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Stomatitis – Cat Mouths Gone Bad

stomatitis in a catImagine your mouth being so inflamed and painful that you couldn’t eat. Maybe it would hurt to talk. And maybe you’ll drool constantly. Doesn’t sound pleasant does it? Sadly, this does happen with cats from time to time and it can be a devastating problem most often referred to as stomatitis (though also called gingivo-stomatitis, ulcerative stomatitis, or lymphocytic-plasmacytic stomatitis).

How did kitty get here?

That’s the million dollar question because despite years of research, the exact cause is unknown. It is thought to have multiple contributing factors including bacteria, viruses, and a poor immune system. It’s impossible to predict if it will happen but it appears in adult cats and perhaps more often in purebred cats such as Persians or Siamese. Most cases are going to end up being chronic and progressive though some sudden onset or shorter term cases can be due to toxic burns. Continue reading

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