Tag: pets (page 1 of 5)

Keep Calm and Socialize Your Pet

Animal behavior is one of the hardest areas of veterinary medicine.  I’ll admit it…it’s not my favorite area and we got virtually no education in the subject during my time in vet school in the early 2000s.  While myself and many other veterinarians have gotten continuing education in the field, behavior problems are still the top reason for animals to be surrendered or euthanized.  It’s a complicated and gray area but I want to give you one of my top tips to help your pet.

Socialize, socialize, socialize!!!

Cat buddies

For dogs & cat, the prime development period where they truly learn to form relationships is between 3-16 weeks of age.  Most of the time, puppies & kittens are still with their mothers until at least 7-8 weeks of age and they can learn to develop a hierarchy.  They will also start to bond with the people who are caring for them.  It’s the time they come home that they can truly start to develop a personality and meet different people.  Use this time to start puppy classes or for your kitten encourage friendly play. Invite your friends over and use the bribery of treats or playtime to let your pet get used to different people.  For cats though, it can likely take a longer time and with people who have a quiet demeanor.

Rudy the couch potato

Additionally, you want to get your pets to meet other animals.  Maybe you have other pets or friends with pets.  You want the interactions to be fun and friendly.  My own dog Rudy has his own issues.  We adopted him when he was 14 months old.  He was given up supposedly for his non-stop energy and activity.  I’m going to call that out as a lie.  He can be a regular couch potato.  Yes, he’s got allergies but he’s also a jerk a lot of the time.  His problem is he doesn’t know how to greet other dogs.  Most of the time he wants to play but to the casual observer he looks like he wants to fight.  We have made our best efforts to help him, and he’s improving, but a lot of this could have been avoided through some proper socialization and behavior training.

socialize your pet

Grateful kisses from Max

The last thing that particularly is troublesome is animals who are afraid of somebody giving them a possibly endless supply of cookies.  Yeah, I’m talking about pets visiting the veterinarian…and most dogs don’t leave without spoiling their dinner with liver treats.  I’m happy when pets are healthy, but I think it’s a disadvantage to them in terms of stress in visiting an unfamiliar place.  I want to encourage everyone to start with your young cat or dog, bring them in regularly for visits just to say hi, get a few treats, or hop up on the scale.  A visit without any poking or prodding can go a long way to reducing stress during those medical visits.  But it doesn’t stop after they become adults.  Your pet should visit the vet at least once a year, even if they seem healthy, it’s good to get that confirmation from your veterinarian but also to maintain a friendly relationship between your pet & their vet.

I encourage you to help your cat or dog adjust to their new life with you and to be a role model for other pets.  Ask your veterinarian or friends and get references for trainers in your area if you need help.  Some of them will use properly updated methods that are more positive for your pet while others use what may be considered archaic or negative reinforcement.  Trust me, your veterinarian and their staff will also thank you for having a well behaved pet.  By encouraging good social skills, our pets can live happier and healthier lives.

Disclaimer: All blog posts are my own opinion and do not reflect those of any current or former employers.

You can also find me on Instagram @drryanllera and as always on Facebook & Twitter!

4 Pet Apps You Should Try

Technology is a fascinating thing in today’s world!  And you & your pets can benefit from some great apps along the way.  Here’s 4 apps that are just waiting for you to download and they’re all free!

APCC (Animal Poison Control Center) – by the ASPCA

Your pet has just eaten something and you’re not sure what it will do to them.  You also wonder if you really need to get to the vet.  This app lets you search by the eaten thing (plants, medications, other household items) then show you the signs you could see and let you know the severity of the poisoning. If it says you should contact your vet, I would listen.  A call to your vet is never a bad idea in these cases anyway.  There’s also the number to the Animal Poison Control Center to help your vet manage the case should it be necessary

BarkCam – by BarkBox, Inc

Do you struggle with getting your pet to focus on the camera for pictures?  Are you tired of making strange noises to get their attention (if you can’t find their favorite squeaky toy)?  Give this app a try to get your pet’s attention with sounds of a doorbell, a squeaking mouse, fire engine, or mooing cow.

ResQwalk – by ResQthreads LLC

Your dog needs a walk!  And this app comes with a bonus.  Aside from tracking how far you’ve walked, each month a pool of money is donated to the charity you choose to walk for based on the proportion of kilometers walked.  Exercise for you & your dog plus helping out animals in need!  Winning!  As bonus features, it will let you know where local vet clinics are and pet friendly shopping, lodging, & restaurants.

Your own veterinary hospital

Yes, more and more clinics are getting their own apps.  Many of these apps are able to let your vet share your pet’s records including vaccine history, medications, and current conditions in case you need to ever visit the emergency clinic or need to share info with your groomer or boarding kennel.  Some of the apps also let you schedule appointments, request medication refills, and make reminders for monthly preventative meds all with the touch of your screen.  Check with your clinic to see what they’ve got!

pet apps

Louie trying out Cat Fishing 2 from Nestle Purina

When all else fails, you can always download Cat Fishing 2 for the kitties to play with!  Try these out and let me know which other apps you think are must haves in the comments below!

Note: I did not receive any compensation from these companies.  These are apps I have used and feel would be of value to you.

Disclaimer: All blog posts are my own opinion and do not reflect those of any current or former employers.

You can also find me on Instagram @drryanllera and as always on Facebook & Twitter!

4 More Veterinary Visit Tips

Admit it, taking your pet to the veterinarian is probably not one of your favorite things to do.  Obviously, there are those times when your fur-baby is sick and that’s understandable you’re dreading the visit especially when the outcome is unknown.  Maybe it’s the cost of things that is frustrating.  Perhaps it’s the time you spend there or the interaction with the clinic staff that have you dreading the visit.  Fear not!  You can help make those trips to your veterinary clinic be more productive, safer, and efficient so we can cooperatively get your pet treated and make the experience less exasperating.  Think of these tips as some of the secrets we think but don’t say out loud.

broken leg puppyIf the presenting complaint is pain, we have to localize the pain – I know what you may be thinking…why do you have to make my pet hurt during the exam?  Yes, it’s true that during an exam we may palpate an area and it may hurt, but we have to know what is ailing your pet.  Afterwards (and before any x-rays), we’ll be more than happy to give your pet pain medication or a sedative to help them relax.  If we can’t find the painful area, then a diagnosis may escape us and your pet might not get the proper treatment.

from Trupanion.com

from Trupanion.com

Why can’t we complete our exam? – One of the things I find to take the most time (thus extending a visit length) is not being able to adequately complete our exam.  Why is this?  Two things….chairs & leashes.  Unfortunately, many pets are still afraid of the veterinary clinic.  When this happens, they tend to climb into a small or covered space in hopes of not being noticed or to make themselves more difficult to be touched.  This often means climbing under a chair.  I don’t mind helping coax Fluffy or Spot (with bribery from treats) out from under a chair but we may feel awkward if you are still sitting on said chair….let’s call it a personal space bubble that we don’t want to pop.

This is where you can help and where the leash comes into play (for dogs at least).  Drop the leash, hold the collar or place your hands on your pet.  Leashes also create prime tripping hazards with a big, happy dog.  If your pet holds still, we can do our jobs better and give you better service.  If a staff member is able to help in an exam room (not always possible), please trust them to handle your baby as if he or she were their own.

aggressive dogNot every pet who comes to the vet clinic is happy or a sweetheart – Admittedly, I will give every patient the benefit of the doubt if they seem leary or if they snap, we will likely want to put a muzzle on them.  I’ve heard people say that veterinarians should not be afraid of animals.  The truth is, we respect them and know what some of them can do.  I’ve known too many colleagues who have been unable to continue working like their accustomed due to a nasty animal related injury.  Animals are also perceptive and if they sense they the staff is uneasy, it may send the wrong signals of being dominant.  Simply put, if your pet has a history of misbehaving, allow us to take proper safety precautions so that nobody gets hurt.  Alternatively, for routine visits, we can often prescribe something ahead of time to help take the edge off and make your pet more relaxed so that their visit may not be such a bad experience.  Many veterinarians are become FearFree certified.

from justcuteanimals.com

from justcuteanimals.com

All we all need is just a little patience – Time spent at the vet clinic can be discouraging.  Whether it is before or after your appointment may make it more so.  A veterinary visit is compromised of multiple parts and interactions, from the client services up front to the veterinary technician to veterinarian and back up to client services.  Wow!  That can be a long time depending on the reason for the visit.  If you show up early, we can make sure your contact info is up to date so that further follow up can be done once you are done with the appointment.  And if we’re able to, we’ll see you early to give you some extra time or try to get you home just a little bit earlier.  On the same token, walking into the clinic with a true emergency (hit by car, active bleeding, trouble breathing, seizuring to name a few) is understandable but we ask that you at least call us before hand so we can prepare and if needed, we can notify our scheduled appointments and give them a chance to reschedule.  If you’re walking in and it’s not an emergency, we will do our best to squeeze you in but there may also be the need to schedule you for a later appointment.

So there you have it…a few more tips to try and help ease the trip to the vet clinic.  A few more tips you say??  Yes, check out part 1 of tips for your vet clinic visit!  And please keep in mind that we are always trying our best for all of our patients so let’s all be courteous to our fellow pet lovers and the clinic staff!  If there’s another piece of advice you have, please share with us in the comments!  Thank you!

Disclaimer:  All blog posts may contain opinions which do not reflect those of my current or any former employers.

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