Tag: Kingston (page 1 of 15)

Dear Gord

Guest Author – Mandy Jackson, RVT

Gord megaesophagus fosterI put a dog to sleep yesterday.  He was my foster dog.  He came to me quite ill, and with a disease I knew I couldn’t cure.  Gord had megaesophagus.  What that meant for him was that his esophagus, the “tube” that carries food from your mouth to your stomach, was stretched out like a balloon that has been blown up and deflated dozens of times.  The muscular contractions, called peristalsis, that help move your and waste through your body did not occur in his esophagus.  I described it as though he had something like a pelican pouch in his throat.  When he ate, much of his food and water would collect in this “pouch”, rather than being digested in his stomach and intestines.  He regurgitated a lot of what he was fed.  He came to me emaciated, needing to gain about 35% of his body weight, a daunting task for both of us.  How do you get a dog who can’t maintain his weight to gain 20 pounds?

megaesophagus foster walkMegaesophagus is an awful disease.  To have a beautiful, kind and gentle soul in your home, starving despite your best attempts to feed him is heartbreaking for you, but unquestionably worse for him.  We tried several different textures and consistencies and with the help of a friend who also cared for Gord in her home while I was unavailable, we learned that “meatballs” worked best for him.  I’d roll his food into golf ball sized nuggets and toss them to him one by one, hold him sitting in the begging position and then go for a short walk.  Water was more difficult, but I taught him to drink from a huge rabbit bottle mounted so he had to hold his head up to drink.  After 3 weeks of trial and error I finally felt like we were on the right path.  That maybe, just maybe, he could be managed.  That he could potentially live a “normal” life.  For almost 5 days he gained weight and strength.  He was producing more urine, and it was becoming paler in colour, showing that he was better hydrated than before.  He walked faster on our short travels, not rude enough to pull me, but enthusiastic enough that I could feel a difference in him.  I was so very proud of him.

And then, on Thursday, I went to check on him in his run at work.  To give him his dinner and spend my lunch break walking him.  He had vomited 3 puddles of blood in his kennel.  My heart sank into my feet.  I will not go into more detail here, but it’s most likely that 2 years of poorly managed megaesophagus left his mind and spirit willing to recover, but his body just too damaged, the last 18 hours of his life caused a shocking transformation in his body and spirit.

Deciding to end the life of a foster is a uniquely horrible experience.  He wasn’t really “my” dog, but I had taken responsibility for his life and his care.  He was mine in trust, on loan, my temporary dog. I was only supposed to be a resting place, a bump in his road.  But there he was, getting sicker in front of me and waiting for me to make it better.  Not able to tell me how he felt, what he wanted.  I sat on my couch with his big, blocky, black velvet head in my lap and promised him that I would make it stop.  My beautiful Gord was not Gord anymore.  For the first time since I met him, he was in pain and that was not part of the deal I made with him.  I took him to work, one last sad car ride.  Carried him into the treatment room and gave his care over to 2 of the loveliest people I’ve ever met.  At the end of his life I wasn’t his nurse or his foster mom anymore.  I was just his person, finally.  Gord of No Fixed Address (the horrible nickname I gave him, a joke that started when a friend suggested I adopt him) was at home in my heart.  I climbed up on the table and wrapped myself around him, buried my face in that perfect spot behind every retriever’s ears and held him close.  He went quietly, left this world in the arms of someone who loved him enough to make that call. Gord with bear

Dear Gord,

I’m sorry.

=======================================

Mandy Jackson RVT

Mandy Jackson is a registered veterinary technician at the Kingston Veterinary Clinic.  Mandy shares her home with her 2 dogs, Auden and Olivia, and her cat, Floyd Pepper.  When she’s not at work, she co-runs Friends of Willow Rescue (an all-breed rescue), is a busy foster-mom, avid reader and a recent convert to the joys of crocheting.

4 More Veterinary Visit Tips

Admit it, taking your pet to the veterinarian is probably not one of your favorite things to do.  Obviously, there are those times when your fur-baby is sick and that’s understandable you’re dreading the visit especially when the outcome is unknown.  Maybe it’s the cost of things that is frustrating.  Perhaps it’s the time you spend there or the interaction with the clinic staff that have you dreading the visit.  Fear not!  You can help make those trips to your veterinary clinic be more productive, safer, and efficient so we can cooperatively get your pet treated and make the experience less exasperating.  Think of these tips as some of the secrets we think but don’t say out loud.

broken leg puppyIf the presenting complaint is pain, we have to localize the pain – I know what you may be thinking…why do you have to make my pet hurt during the exam?  Yes, it’s true that during an exam we may palpate an area and it may hurt, but we have to know what is ailing your pet.  Afterwards (and before any x-rays), we’ll be more than happy to give your pet pain medication or a sedative to help them relax.  If we can’t find the painful area, then a diagnosis may escape us and your pet might not get the proper treatment.

from Trupanion.com

from Trupanion.com

Why can’t we complete our exam? – One of the things I find to take the most time (thus extending a visit length) is not being able to adequately complete our exam.  Why is this?  Two things….chairs & leashes.  Unfortunately, many pets are still afraid of the veterinary clinic.  When this happens, they tend to climb into a small or covered space in hopes of not being noticed or to make themselves more difficult to be touched.  This often means climbing under a chair.  I don’t mind helping coax Fluffy or Spot (with bribery from treats) out from under a chair but we may feel awkward if you are still sitting on said chair….let’s call it a personal space bubble that we don’t want to pop.

This is where you can help and where the leash comes into play (for dogs at least).  Drop the leash, hold the collar or place your hands on your pet.  Leashes also create prime tripping hazards with a big, happy dog.  If your pet holds still, we can do our jobs better and give you better service.  If a staff member is able to help in an exam room (not always possible), please trust them to handle your baby as if he or she were their own.

aggressive dogNot every pet who comes to the vet clinic is happy or a sweetheart – Admittedly, I will give every patient the benefit of the doubt if they seem leary or if they snap, we will likely want to put a muzzle on them.  I’ve heard people say that veterinarians should not be afraid of animals.  The truth is, we respect them and know what some of them can do.  I’ve known too many colleagues who have been unable to continue working like their accustomed due to a nasty animal related injury.  Animals are also perceptive and if they sense they the staff is uneasy, it may send the wrong signals of being dominant.  Simply put, if your pet has a history of misbehaving, allow us to take proper safety precautions so that nobody gets hurt.  Alternatively, for routine visits, we can often prescribe something ahead of time to help take the edge off and make your pet more relaxed so that their visit may not be such a bad experience.  Many veterinarians are become FearFree certified.

from justcuteanimals.com

from justcuteanimals.com

All we all need is just a little patience – Time spent at the vet clinic can be discouraging.  Whether it is before or after your appointment may make it more so.  A veterinary visit is compromised of multiple parts and interactions, from the client services up front to the veterinary technician to veterinarian and back up to client services.  Wow!  That can be a long time depending on the reason for the visit.  If you show up early, we can make sure your contact info is up to date so that further follow up can be done once you are done with the appointment.  And if we’re able to, we’ll see you early to give you some extra time or try to get you home just a little bit earlier.  On the same token, walking into the clinic with a true emergency (hit by car, active bleeding, trouble breathing, seizuring to name a few) is understandable but we ask that you at least call us before hand so we can prepare and if needed, we can notify our scheduled appointments and give them a chance to reschedule.  If you’re walking in and it’s not an emergency, we will do our best to squeeze you in but there may also be the need to schedule you for a later appointment.

So there you have it…a few more tips to try and help ease the trip to the vet clinic.  A few more tips you say??  Yes, check out part 1 of tips for your vet clinic visit!  And please keep in mind that we are always trying our best for all of our patients so let’s all be courteous to our fellow pet lovers and the clinic staff!  If there’s another piece of advice you have, please share with us in the comments!  Thank you!

Disclaimer:  All blog posts may contain opinions which do not reflect those of my current or any former employers.

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Dog Parks – The Good, The Bad, & The Furry

Dog Parks – The Good, The Bad, & The Furry

Over the past several years, dog parks have sprung up in communities as a place for your canine companion to get some exercise and depending on rules, meet other dogs.  Dog parks can be wonderful places, but they aren’t meant for everybody.  Let’s look at why this is and also review some etiquette.

The Good

Photo: Herne Bay Coastal Park

Photo: Herne Bay Coastal Park

Everyone loves their own dog.  Many people love other dogs.  Visiting the dog park is a great place to get your dog socialized to other people and dogs to help acclimate them and hopefully avoid some unwanted behaviors.  Dogs evolved as pack animals and the social aspect can be good for their mental stimulation.  You also will get to meet new people, maybe even your future spouse or a new close friend.  Rover will also get that much needed exercise to help fight off obesity by staying active.

The Bad

Photo: personalsafetyexpert.com

Photo: personalsafetyexpert.com

Remember what I said about dogs being pack animals?  Well, that can work against them as dogs meet each other for the first time, the potential for dominance aggression behavior is always possible.  Yes, dogs like children might fight on the playground.  Fights should try to be broken up by calling your dog or making some noise to distract them which might make it easier to pull them apart.  Another downside to these public places is that they can be a breeding ground for disease.  Infectious viruses, bacterial infections, or parasites can all be picked up at the park.  Also, dogs will be dogs…and if your dog is not spayed or neutered, then somebody could be expecting puppies in around 2 months.

The Furry (the Etiquette)pickupafteryourpet1

  • Make sure your pet is vaccinated and is free of fleas.  Not only are you protecting your dog, but also everyone else and the public.

  • Spay or neuter your pet!  This will help prevent unwanted behaviors which can lead to fights or unwanted puppies.  If spay/neuter is not an option, please keep your in heat dogs away for at least 2 weeks after the visible signs have stopped.

  • Teach your dog simple commands – sit, stay, and come are three basic commands to ensure everyone has a safe and enjoyable time.

  • Before letting your dog off leash, it can be a good idea to let them meet the other dogs to see how their personalities and initial reactions are.  If there are obvious signs of aggression, you still have control while they are on leash and can pick another time to come back.

  • If you know your dog is anxious or does not play well with others, go at times that are less busy.  This category might also include a new dog to the family that has not had time to get trained yet.  Another recommendation is to tie a yellow ribbon onto their leash or collar as a sign to others that your dog needs space.  For more info, check out the Yellow Dog Project.

  • Avoid bringing toys or other personal possessions of your dog which may cause conflict with others.  If you bring something, perhaps a new toy is in order so your dog does not feel possessive.

  • Limit your time at the park to no more than 60 minutes.  Not only does this let other dogs & families have a turn but it also is a good way to make sure your dog does not get over heated.

  • And lastly, pick up after your pooch!

A trip to the dog park can be a great bonding experience for you & your canine companion.  Just be sure to be safe and courteous so that everyone has an enjoyable time!

 Disclaimer:  Blog posts may contain opinions which are my own and do not reflect that of any current or former employers.

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