Category: Preventative Health (page 1 of 13)

Tell Me Your Pet’s Secrets

pet historyBeing a veterinarian is a very fun and rewarding career, but it’s also immensely challenging.  The only other job that might come close is being a pediatrician.  Face it, our patients can’t talk…unless we’re watching the Eddie Murphy remake of “Dr. Doolittle” (which was quite enjoyable I might add).  Being completely honest, your pet has secrets and you are the secret keeper.  No, I don’t mean what Rover really thinks of your new party outfit; but rather the all important pet history taking that starts every vet visit.

The best doctor in the world is the veterinarian.  He can’t ask his patients what is the matter-he’s got to just know.” – Will Rogers

Okay, so there’s some truth to this quote.  We can’t ask our patients what the problem is (and I know some pretty awesome veterinary doctors).  The false part is that we’ve “got to just know.”  Unfortunately, it doesn’t work like that.  This is where you come in and why veterinary medicine is a team effort.

A Costly Secret

When we ask you questions at the beginning of the appointment, these details may be quite pertinent to figuring out what the problem is that is plaguing your pet.  There was once a dog I saw that came in for being unable to walk and had some progressive weakness in it’s legs.  It was a young Rottweiler that the owners had assured me had gotten into nothing and had not suffered any trauma.  It was still quite a mystery even after a thorough physical exam.  Her owners authorized some radiographs & blood tests and left her at the hospital for the tests and supportive care.  A few hours later when I called for an update and to go over the results, the owners informed me they had used pure tea tree oil to address a flea problem.  Diagnosis: tea tree oil toxicity which can cause a temporary paralysis type syndrome.  Had this been known earlier, she could have been treated more promptly and for less cost.  No worries though, she recovered and was back to normal within a few days.

Honesty Leads to Success

When you call the hospital before coming in, it allows us to get prepared for taking care of your pet.  But we can only be as ready as the information given to us is complete.  One of the craziest toxicity cases I’ve ever seen involved a dog who had gotten into his owner’s medications…all 9 of them!  How would we know what to treat first without knowing everything involved?  That little dog did fine too especially since his owner admitted to some narcotics in the house.

pet historyBe up front with us.  Be honest.  Veterinarians don’t make a habit or policy of calling the cops on you or telling everyone they know about your pet and their antics.  Don’t be afraid or ashamed to tell us the truth about what might be going on with your pet.  The more information you can give us, the better.  We won’t judge.  So don’t hold back; tell me your pet’s secrets.

Disclaimer: Blog posts may contain some opinions which are my own and may not reflect those of any current or former employers. 

Don’t forget to follow along on Instagram @drryanllera , Facebook , or  Twitter for more pet info and interesting daily happenings!

Why Wounds Shouldn’t Wait

The warmer weather has finally arrived.  Dogs and cats are out playing.  Outdoor cats are once again patrolling their territory.  Sometimes that playtime or territorial behavior can end up in somebody getting  a cat or dog bite wound or other type of injury caused by their exploration.  You know what else is back?  Bugs….specifically flies, mosquitoes, fleas, and ticks – but more on this later.

Superficial wounds would classify as scrapes, scratches, abrasions, and bruising.  In many of these cases, they can be addressed at home by basic first aid cleaning.  Yet, if it doesn’t seem to be going well, you should get your pet in to be checked by their veterinarian.  It’s the nasty bite wounds and lacerations that I’m mostly worried about.

dog bite wound

A wound that waited too long

In medicine, we have what is called the “golden period” when discussing wounds.  This is the optimal time period in which we have to clean and repair a wound.  Over the course of history, the length of time has varied between 6-24 hours.  Generally, after this time, wound repair becomes more complicated as the edges have generally dried up or become necrotic.  This is the real reason it’s a bad idea to wait or try to treat these larger or deeper wounds at home.  The longer it takes for a wound to be addressed leads to increased pain, risk of infection, time to heal, and increased costs.

dog bite wound

Drain placement for a pocketed wound

Some wounds might be simple punctures.  Yet, some of those puncture wounds also include pulling away of the skin from the underneath subcutaneous layers.  This creates a pocketing effect where inflammatory fluid can accumulate.  If the hole closes up too quickly and the wound hasn’t been adequately flushed, this is how abscesses are created and drain will need to be placed during a surgical procedure.  The time it may not go exactly this way is bite wounds on the legs which causes a diffuse, painful inflammation around the muscles and nerves – this is one of the most common reasons I see outdoor cats limping.

From Univ. of Florida Entomology Dept

Remember those bugs?  Flies are the worst ones when it comes to wounds as they have no decency!  Some flies may lay eggs in a pet’s wound and when that happens what amounts to an alien horde is going to beam down next.  Once the eggs hatch, you get maggots.  Ick!  While they prevent the wound from healing, they can also lead to further infection and pain.  Maggots need to be cleaned out, in one piece, and the dead tissue needs to be removed followed by additional treatments.  Breaking or crushing maggots could lead to the release of substances that can cause shock, an anaphylactic reaction, or even death.

As you can see, wounds can be a serious matter and in some cases just “waiting to see how they turn out” could lead to further problems.  At a minimum, get it checked out and don’t delay.  Early intervention can prevent bigger problems in the long run!

Disclaimer: All blog posts are my own opinion and do not reflect those of any current or former employers.

You can also find me on Instagram @drryanllera and as always on Facebook & Twitter!

Keep Calm and Socialize Your Pet

Animal behavior is one of the hardest areas of veterinary medicine.  I’ll admit it…it’s not my favorite area and we got virtually no education in the subject during my time in vet school in the early 2000s.  While myself and many other veterinarians have gotten continuing education in the field, behavior problems are still the top reason for animals to be surrendered or euthanized.  It’s a complicated and gray area but I want to give you one of my top tips to help your pet.

Socialize, socialize, socialize!!!

Cat buddies

For dogs & cat, the prime development period where they truly learn to form relationships is between 3-16 weeks of age.  Most of the time, puppies & kittens are still with their mothers until at least 7-8 weeks of age and they can learn to develop a hierarchy.  They will also start to bond with the people who are caring for them.  It’s the time they come home that they can truly start to develop a personality and meet different people.  Use this time to start puppy classes or for your kitten encourage friendly play. Invite your friends over and use the bribery of treats or playtime to let your pet get used to different people.  For cats though, it can likely take a longer time and with people who have a quiet demeanor.

Rudy the couch potato

Additionally, you want to get your pets to meet other animals.  Maybe you have other pets or friends with pets.  You want the interactions to be fun and friendly.  My own dog Rudy has his own issues.  We adopted him when he was 14 months old.  He was given up supposedly for his non-stop energy and activity.  I’m going to call that out as a lie.  He can be a regular couch potato.  Yes, he’s got allergies but he’s also a jerk a lot of the time.  His problem is he doesn’t know how to greet other dogs.  Most of the time he wants to play but to the casual observer he looks like he wants to fight.  We have made our best efforts to help him, and he’s improving, but a lot of this could have been avoided through some proper socialization and behavior training.

socialize your pet

Grateful kisses from Max

The last thing that particularly is troublesome is animals who are afraid of somebody giving them a possibly endless supply of cookies.  Yeah, I’m talking about pets visiting the veterinarian…and most dogs don’t leave without spoiling their dinner with liver treats.  I’m happy when pets are healthy, but I think it’s a disadvantage to them in terms of stress in visiting an unfamiliar place.  I want to encourage everyone to start with your young cat or dog, bring them in regularly for visits just to say hi, get a few treats, or hop up on the scale.  A visit without any poking or prodding can go a long way to reducing stress during those medical visits.  But it doesn’t stop after they become adults.  Your pet should visit the vet at least once a year, even if they seem healthy, it’s good to get that confirmation from your veterinarian but also to maintain a friendly relationship between your pet & their vet.

I encourage you to help your cat or dog adjust to their new life with you and to be a role model for other pets.  Ask your veterinarian or friends and get references for trainers in your area if you need help.  Some of them will use properly updated methods that are more positive for your pet while others use what may be considered archaic or negative reinforcement.  Trust me, your veterinarian and their staff will also thank you for having a well behaved pet.  By encouraging good social skills, our pets can live happier and healthier lives.

Disclaimer: All blog posts are my own opinion and do not reflect those of any current or former employers.

You can also find me on Instagram @drryanllera and as always on Facebook & Twitter!

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