Category: Dogs (page 1 of 4)

A Promise to Patients

My New Promise to Patients

I graduated from veterinary school in 2006.  Wow – that wasn’t that long ago, or was it?  It’s only been 12 years but since then veterinary medicine has changed.  Medically, we have made more advances to provide better top-notch care.  However, socially and perception-wise, veterinary medicine has been tarnished due to the evolution of the internet and social media.  It has driven a number of my colleagues out of the profession, into a depressive state, or in the worst cases – suicide.  I’m doing fine and am constantly evolving to provide the best care that I can.  As a result, this is my promise to patients: Continue reading

Spay & Neuter – A Revised Point of View

The times they are a changing.  Every now and then in the course of medicine, we get new research that guides us to change our ways of thinking and how we practice.  And we live in exciting times because now is one of those moments.  New research has been presented regarding potentially more appropriate age of spay or neuter surgery for your dog, most notably larger dogs.  Don’t worry, I’ll also discuss cats.

age of spay or neuter can affect many heath factors

No, I haven’t changed my stance that the procedure should still be done.  But I agree and am glad to see some changes in the timing of when we as veterinarians recommend the surgery happen.  Let’s explore this and try make sense of the differences.

The first thing you have to look at is what breed, or at least size, of dog you have.  The next thing you have to consider is what are your goals you’re trying to achieve with your pet’s health – joint development & health, cancer risks, behavior, etc.  Lastly, we need to consider their lifestyle.  Much of the research focused on some common breeds (Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers , Rottweilers, Viszlas) but we can try to extrapolate from this data.  So let’s discuss…. Continue reading

Cognitive Dysfunction & Your Dog

What is Cognitive Dysfunction?

One of the saddest things you may experience in your life is seeing someone you know who was so full of life, so vibrant, so smart…all of the sudden just seem to not be able to think clearly anymore.  Imagine if this was your dog.  Yes, what we see in people such as senility, Alzheimer’s disease, or “sundowners syndrome” can also be seen in dogs (and possibly in cats but much less understood).  The entire cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS) has been an emerging area of understanding in the last several years.  While senior pets may show signs that could be attributed to medical issues, those potential diseases should be ruled out before coming to the conclusion of what is considered to be a behavioral problem.

Studies have shown that starting around 6-7 years of age, dogs may start showing signs.  Oftentimes, these go unnoticed until the condition has progressed to severe levels.  Signs can include greater attention seeking to seeming to want to interact less with family, increased anxiety levels in situations that used to not bother them, and becoming less responsive when called or given a command.  And these are the harder ones to note sometimes but also may not be as concerning in the mind of the family.  Signs more likely to get attention are soiling in the house, restlessness at night (stay up all night and sleep in the daytime), or pacing constantly.

What can we do to help?

cognitive dysfunction enrichment

Jennifer & Keltie rally obedience practice

The sooner signs are noted or addressed, the better chance we have of helping a dog’s quality of life.  Much like we encourage enrichment for cats or exotic pets, dogs can benefit from such activities as scent detection, competitive obedience, or agility – activities that help them think and positively stimulate their brains.  Sometimes just playing and interacting with your dog can be a good start.  It’s important to keep in mind any medical or physical limitations, especially as your pup ages.  Adding in toys can always be a good idea especially puzzles or toys that dispense food to keep then thinking and engaged.

Further treatment to help alleviate signs can be found with some medications but their effects may be variable from patient to patient.  Medications and supplements should be discussed with your veterinarian to determine what might work best for your particular dog and what the proper dosages are.  Senior pet diets supplemented with fatty acids, antioxidants, and medium chain triglycerides can also be beneficial.  There is a lot of exciting research and new tools to help these patients coming in the near future.

Due to our ability to better recognize these problems and the tendency for the earliest signs to start at middle to early senior years, it truly is important to have your pet checked out at least once a year.  There may be something we can work on together to help you and your dog live in harmony while working through cognitive dysfunction.  Have you noted any changes or signs mentioned above in your dog?  If so, what have you done that seems to help?

Disclaimer: Blog posts may contain some opinions which are my own and may not reflect those of any current or former employers. 

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