Category: Medical & Chronic Health (page 1 of 6)

Pet Cancer – What You Need to Know

pet cancer spaying could have prevented this ovarian tumorEven though November is Pet Cancer Awareness Month, there’s never a bad time to talk about it.  It’s a sad part of any type of medicine and more so when we’re talking about animals.  They can’t tell us how they feel, they don’t have socialized health care, and they can’t take themselves to the veterinarian.

I’ve seen enough cancer cases that it breaks my heart each time, even more so when it could have been addressed early on and prevented more of a challenge to the pet and veterinary team along with costing less.  In many cases, these pets are often euthanized because it’s just gone too far.  In general practice, on average I’d say I see about 1 malignant cancer case every 3-4 weeks.  Malignant equals bad; but sometimes even those benign masses can be problematic.  And yes, sometimes those benign masses can morph into a malignant mass.

Why is this happening?

Pets are living longer, plain and simple.  And while some people are aware of what to look for, we can do better.

What can we do?

pet cancer mammary mass

Your pet needs to be seen by your veterinarian at least once a year, maybe every 6 months even, depending on their health status.  You may be able to find a lump on your dog but there is more that could possibly be seen or detected by your veterinarian as well as determining normal versus abnormal.  An exam is a start and some tests can be done whether simple or more complex.

My friend Dr. Sue Ettinger, DACVIM (yes, animal cancer specialist!) has created a program with a simple mantra – See Something, Do Something.  This is an easy way to remember that if you see a lump, larger than a pea and there for more than a month, it’s time to get it checked out!  A simple needle aspiration can save a life.

Cancer is not a death sentence.  There are so many options out there and animals don’t experience the same side effects of chemo that people do.  Surgery might be curative. Even if you’re not apt to go these routes, we can still help you palliate and keep your pet comfortable.  One of the most important aspects of this is not waiting too long. Lumps start small and then they may grow.  When these lumps grow, they become harder to treat, less chance for a successful outcome, and more expensive.  Act sooner rather than later to give your pet the best chance.

Even though we might only focus on this for a month, there is always time to be aware of potential cancer problems with your pets.  You are your pet’s biggest advocate and your veterinarian is there to help.  We can’t do it alone though so heed this advice and make sure if you have concerns to bring them up to your vet as soon as you think there’s a problem.

Disclaimer: Blog posts may contain some opinions which are my own and may not reflect those of any current or former employers. 

Don’t forget to follow along on Instagram @drryanllera , Facebook , or  Twitter for more pet info and interesting daily happenings!

Cognitive Dysfunction & Your Dog

What is Cognitive Dysfunction?

One of the saddest things you may experience in your life is seeing someone you know who was so full of life, so vibrant, so smart…all of the sudden just seem to not be able to think clearly anymore.  Imagine if this was your dog.  Yes, what we see in people such as senility, Alzheimer’s disease, or “sundowners syndrome” can also be seen in dogs (and possibly in cats but much less understood).  The entire cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS) has been an emerging area of understanding in the last several years.  While senior pets may show signs that could be attributed to medical issues, those potential diseases should be ruled out before coming to the conclusion of what is considered to be a behavioral problem.

Studies have shown that starting around 6-7 years of age, dogs may start showing signs.  Oftentimes, these go unnoticed until the condition has progressed to severe levels.  Signs can include greater attention seeking to seeming to want to interact less with family, increased anxiety levels in situations that used to not bother them, and becoming less responsive when called or given a command.  And these are the harder ones to note sometimes but also may not be as concerning in the mind of the family.  Signs more likely to get attention are soiling in the house, restlessness at night (stay up all night and sleep in the daytime), or pacing constantly.

What can we do to help?

cognitive dysfunction enrichment

Jennifer & Keltie rally obedience practice

The sooner signs are noted or addressed, the better chance we have of helping a dog’s quality of life.  Much like we encourage enrichment for cats or exotic pets, dogs can benefit from such activities as scent detection, competitive obedience, or agility – activities that help them think and positively stimulate their brains.  Sometimes just playing and interacting with your dog can be a good start.  It’s important to keep in mind any medical or physical limitations, especially as your pup ages.  Adding in toys can always be a good idea especially puzzles or toys that dispense food to keep then thinking and engaged.

Further treatment to help alleviate signs can be found with some medications but their effects may be variable from patient to patient.  Medications and supplements should be discussed with your veterinarian to determine what might work best for your particular dog and what the proper dosages are.  Senior pet diets supplemented with fatty acids, antioxidants, and medium chain triglycerides can also be beneficial.  There is a lot of exciting research and new tools to help these patients coming in the near future.

Due to our ability to better recognize these problems and the tendency for the earliest signs to start at middle to early senior years, it truly is important to have your pet checked out at least once a year.  There may be something we can work on together to help you and your dog live in harmony while working through cognitive dysfunction.  Have you noted any changes or signs mentioned above in your dog?  If so, what have you done that seems to help?

Disclaimer: Blog posts may contain some opinions which are my own and may not reflect those of any current or former employers. 

Don’t forget to follow along on Instagram @drryanllera , Facebook , or  Twitter for more pet info and interesting daily happenings!

Why Wounds Shouldn’t Wait

The warmer weather has finally arrived.  Dogs and cats are out playing.  Outdoor cats are once again patrolling their territory.  Sometimes that playtime or territorial behavior can end up in somebody getting  a cat or dog bite wound or other type of injury caused by their exploration.  You know what else is back?  Bugs….specifically flies, mosquitoes, fleas, and ticks – but more on this later.

Superficial wounds would classify as scrapes, scratches, abrasions, and bruising.  In many of these cases, they can be addressed at home by basic first aid cleaning.  Yet, if it doesn’t seem to be going well, you should get your pet in to be checked by their veterinarian.  It’s the nasty bite wounds and lacerations that I’m mostly worried about.

dog bite wound

A wound that waited too long

In medicine, we have what is called the “golden period” when discussing wounds.  This is the optimal time period in which we have to clean and repair a wound.  Over the course of history, the length of time has varied between 6-24 hours.  Generally, after this time, wound repair becomes more complicated as the edges have generally dried up or become necrotic.  This is the real reason it’s a bad idea to wait or try to treat these larger or deeper wounds at home.  The longer it takes for a wound to be addressed leads to increased pain, risk of infection, time to heal, and increased costs.

dog bite wound

Drain placement for a pocketed wound

Some wounds might be simple punctures.  Yet, some of those puncture wounds also include pulling away of the skin from the underneath subcutaneous layers.  This creates a pocketing effect where inflammatory fluid can accumulate.  If the hole closes up too quickly and the wound hasn’t been adequately flushed, this is how abscesses are created and drain will need to be placed during a surgical procedure.  The time it may not go exactly this way is bite wounds on the legs which causes a diffuse, painful inflammation around the muscles and nerves – this is one of the most common reasons I see outdoor cats limping.

From Univ. of Florida Entomology Dept

Remember those bugs?  Flies are the worst ones when it comes to wounds as they have no decency!  Some flies may lay eggs in a pet’s wound and when that happens what amounts to an alien horde is going to beam down next.  Once the eggs hatch, you get maggots.  Ick!  While they prevent the wound from healing, they can also lead to further infection and pain.  Maggots need to be cleaned out, in one piece, and the dead tissue needs to be removed followed by additional treatments.  Breaking or crushing maggots could lead to the release of substances that can cause shock, an anaphylactic reaction, or even death.

As you can see, wounds can be a serious matter and in some cases just “waiting to see how they turn out” could lead to further problems.  At a minimum, get it checked out and don’t delay.  Early intervention can prevent bigger problems in the long run!

Disclaimer: All blog posts are my own opinion and do not reflect those of any current or former employers.

You can also find me on Instagram @drryanllera and as always on Facebook & Twitter!

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